Wednesday, May 14, 2008

Best Children's Books





Frances Hodgson, The Secret Garden
Loved this book. The main character Mary was born in India and then moved to Yorkshire after the death of her parents (maybe I felt some extra connection with the story as my own mother was born in India and then grew up in Yorkshire). I remember my Yorkshire grandmother reading it to me and rereading myself a few times. The Secret Garden seemed to be full of magic.

Roald Dahl, Danny, the Champion of the World
The BFG

Padraic Colum, The King of Ireland's Son
The Story of King Arthur and Other Celtic Heroes
The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths

Brothers Grim, The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales

Astrid Lindgren, Ronia, the Robber's Daughter

Cynthia Voigt,
Tillerman Cycle

Louisa May Alcott, Little Women (Series)

Laura Ingalls Wilder,
Little House on the Prairie

L. M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

George MacDonald, The Princess and the Goblin

JRR Tolkien, The Hobbit
Enjoyed it as a kid though am a bit over it (ditto with the Narnia books).

Anne Holm, I am David

Esther Hautzig, The Endless Steppe

Phillipa Pearce, Tom's Midnight Garden

E. Nesbit, The Story of the Treasure Seekers

CS Lewis, The Chronicle of Narnia

Alan Wagstaff, Trinanoch
A life-changing journey begins when twins, Katherine and Thomas Rayner, fall through coloured light pouring from a church window into a different reality - Trinanoch. They have been called by the dwarfish q'Boldi and soon learn that a powerful enemy has set his sights on ruling the everyday world of the twins. Though they must help to thwart the enemy's plans, no one can explain what they must do or how to begin. And, in the end, what if the enemy seems to have the power to save their world? Did they choose the right side?
(OK, this is by my Dad and I have fond memories of him reading it to us when we were kids)

Madeline L'Engle, A Wrinkle in Time

Tamora Pierce, The Song of the Lioness
Don't know if this book holds up but I enjoyed reading a book with a strong female heroin when I was about 12.

Isabel Wyatt, The Seven-Year-Old Wonder Book
I always remember the main character Sylvia. It felt special as seven year old to have a book specifically for me - not sure if it would hold up though (need to read it again - it's been a few years!).


10 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

eva heard of a book called STIG OT THE DUMP?

if you aven

4:25 pm  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

ah shit t is thin g

4:26 pm  
Blogger Skyler said...

Yes, I remember it was good. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stig_of_the_Dump

4:29 pm  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

it STILL IS good!

4:37 pm  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

why is i not on yur ist?
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4:38 pm  
Blogger Richard Taylor said...

I always wanted to read "The Secret Garden" - the title seems fascinating.

I read "Alice Through the Looking Glass" etc in fact its based on a Chess game which is what got me interested in Chess.
I just (last year) recently read The Hobbit - I haven't read the LOTRs - The Hobbit was great.

When I was in Ron's shop we were often asked for I was David - I have sold it quite few times also.

The first editions of those writers are all very valuable if the book is in good condition with a d/w

BTW Jack Ross probably didn't read children's books as he would have gown up immediately he was born! I think he began his first PhD when he was 7....

Maps is another matter.

9:55 pm  
Anonymous Marcus said...

Books i loved as a kid:

Wizard of Earthsea books, Ursula Le Guin. (Given that she's also written some of the best fantasy/scifi books for adults, she's gotta be in there)

The Dark Is Rising series by Susan Cooper.

I'm reading bits of them to my kids now and they seem old. Strangely political compared to the books written now. (which i also read to them).

2:29 am  
Blogger Richard Taylor said...

Just noticed your father wrote a book - it sounds intriguing.

7:27 pm  
Anonymous buy Cialis said...

Great books indeed, although a few of them can be catalog as not only for kids.

7:01 am  
Anonymous Generic Cialis said...

The Secret Garden opens by introducing us to Mary Lennox, a sickly, foul-tempered, unsightly little girl who loves no one and whom no one loves. At the outset of the story, she is living in India with her parents—a dashing army captain and his frivolous, beautiful wife—but is rarely permitted to see them.

8:02 am  

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